Our Board

Social Good Fund Board of Director Bios:

Michael Pace-President
Michael Pace is the Executive Director and Founder of Social Good
Fund. He has over 15 years of experience working with non-profits and
managing businesses. Michael has helped to build organizations in
their start-up phase and has worked with on a range of issues,
including environmental justice, youth development, municipal
programming, and urban health. Michael currently serves on the Board
of Directors at Niroga Institute, an established nonprofit working
with at-risk youth in the San Francisco East Bay Area. He has also
served on the Board of Directors of Your Special Child Development
Center, an organization addressing the needs of children with autism.
Michael graduated from Stanford University with a B.A. in Philosophy
and is currently pursuing an MA in Information Science from San Jose
State University.

 

Bouapha Toomaly-Treasurer
Bouapha Toommaly serves as the Chief Financial Officer at ISEEED,
bringing hands-on fiscal and operational management experience to the
I-SEEED team with a top-level, holistic perspective focused on
maximizing impact for our communities.

Bouapha Toommaly has worked for the past 20 years for a variety of national and local social change,
social service, and governance organizations as an agent of change.
Her career has focused on building, maintaining, and improving
integrity of financial, programmatic and operational infrastructure
that supports organizations in achieving their mission.

Meso Tadeo-Secretary
Meso Tadeo has dedicated the last 15 years to participating in
volunteerism and service to his community. He has developed an
expertise in community relationship building and personal upliftment.
As part of East Bay Agency for Children’s CIRCLE OF CARE Program, he
was part of a bi-weekly Support Group for children with terminally ill
parents or guardians. He has also spent time as a hospice volunteer
where he shared his qualities empathy, compassion, and a deep concern
for the well-being of others. He values human relations above all
else, and puts his actions where his heart is.

 

Test Your Alzheimer’s Risk Profile

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To help you outline an individualized approach for your health, Dr. Vincent Fortanasce, Neurologist and author of “The Anti-Alzheimer’s Prescription” has designed the following 25-item questionnaire that analyzes your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

The best way to approach the Alzheimer’s Risk Profile is to take a piece of paper, number it from 1 to 25, and record your answers (“T” or “F”).  At the end of the quiz you can compute your “Actual Brain Age” using the measurement keys outlined below.

True or False

  1. I have “longevity genes” in my family, with members who lived to 80 and older without memory loss.
  2. I do not have close relatives who have had Alzheimer’s disease (Grand Parents, Mother, Father, Siblings).
  3. I get 7 to 8 hours (or more) of sleep each night.
  4. I eat at least 4 or more servings of fruits and vegetables high in antioxidants daily.
  5. I eat at least one serving of blueberries, raspberries, or blackberries daily.
  6. I eat baked or broiled non-farmed cold water fish once or twice a week.
  7. I eat at least one serving of cruciferous vegetables – cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, spinach okra and kale 5 times per week.
  8. I eat Yogurt, Kefir or other probiotics 3 times a week.
  9. I eat a Mediterranean style diet (high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts and seeds and olive oil or coconut oil as the source of fat.
  10. I eat organically raised eggs as part of breakfast 3 times a week.
  11. I take fish oil supplements high in omega-3 fatty acids or flaxseed supplements at least 5 times per week.
  12. I take folic acid supplementation, Vitamin B-12 and Vitamin B-6 with my daily multivitamin.
  13. I drink red wine or grape juice at least 5 times a week.
  14. I exercise most days of the week for at least 30 minutes each time (total of three hours or more of strenuous exercise weekly).
  15. I read challenging books, do crossword puzzles or Sudoku, or engage in activities that require active learning, memorization, computation, analysis, and problem solving at least five times a week.
  16. My total cholesterol is less than 200.
  17. I am not obese (less than 20 pounds overweight for a woman; less than 30 pounds overweight for a man).
  18. I use olive oil and no trans-fat spreads or margarine.
  19. I have never smoked cigarettes.
  20. I have normal blood pressure.
  21. I do not have diabetes.
  22. I do not have a sleep disorder such as snoring or obstructive sleep apnea or untreated insomnia.
  23. Daily uncontrolled stress is not a problem for me.
  24. I have a strong support group and enjoy many activities with friends, colleagues, and family members.
  25. I have no problems with short- or long-term memory.

 

This is just a simple measure of tallying your score and applying the findings to your diet and lifestyle habits.

Follow Measurement Keys to determine your “Real Brain Age” and your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

This is just a simple measure of tallying your score and applying the findings to your diet and lifestyle habits.

Measurement Keys:

23 – 25 Congratulations! You are aging well. Subtract 15 years from your chronological age for your Real Brain Age.
You are in great health with a youthful, productive mind! By following the “Alzheimer’s Prevention” strategies listed in our website, you can make your body, mind and spirit even healthier. Unless things change in your life, your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease is low.

20 – 22 Not bad! Subtract 10 years from your chronological age for your Real Brain Age.
You are doing a lot to take care of your physical and mental health. Check the specific questions that you marked as False – and pay attention to changes you may need to make. By Following the “Alzheimer’s Prevention” strategies listed in our website, you can make your body, mind and spirit even healthier.

15 – 19 OK. Your Real Brain Age is the same as your chronological age.
That said, you have a mild risk of Alzheimer’s disease, so pay attention. Carefully review steps to determine changes that need to be made with your diet, exercise, mental stimulation or rest and relaxation.  Follow the UCLA Brain Boosting Guidelines outlined in our website to minimize your risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

12 – 14  You have a moderate risk of Alzheimer ’s disease. Add 5 years to your chronological age for your Real Brain Age.
While there is not a great disparity between your Real Brain Age and your chronologic age, you need to seriously understand your risks of developing Alzheimer’s disease. It is important that you review the quiz  and talk to your doctor about your risk factors and treatment recommendations. In addition, follow the UCLA Brain Boosting Guidelines outlined in our  website or read the book “The Anti-Alzheimer’s Prescription” and flag those pages that may help to decrease your risk of Alzheimer’s disease

0 – 11 You have a high risk of Alzheimer’s disease. Add 10 years to your chronological age for your Real Brain Age.

 

Our Mentors

Dr. Vincent M. Fortanasce

mentorsDr. Vincent M. Fortanasce is certified by the Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and is a Clinical and Associate Professor of Neurology at USC. He trained at The Institute of Living, an affiliate hospital of Yale University; Nassau Hospital, an affiliate hospital of Cornell University; and at the USC Medical Center.
His outstanding contributions to the medical field and the community have been recognized by President Bill Clinton, Governor Pete Wilson, Representative Drier, and Senators Feinstein. He is a former board member of the Los Angeles County Medical Association and Law and Medical Combined Board of Ethics. He has lectured at Stanford University and The Institute of Living at Yale.

Dr. Fortanasce has published numerous articles and six successful trade books.
The Anti-Alzheimer’s Prescription has been hailed as the first comprehensive book to help prevent Alzheimer’s disease.
Dr. Fortanasce has appeared on 60 Minutes, The Today Show, Dr. Phil, Dateline and Good Morning America. He has been quoted in Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The New Yorker, The New York Times, and The Los Angeles Times.

Dr. Dale Bredesen

dr_bredesenDr. Dale Bredesen was the Buck Institute’s founding President and CEO and is an internationally recognized expert on Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Bredesen’s ground-breaking discoveries have led to a recent clinical trial as well as evidence for memory loss reversal associated with Alzheimer’s disease using lifestyle modifications. He earned his M.D. from Duke University Medical Center and served as Chief Resident in Neurology at UCSF before joining Nobel laureate Stanley Prusiner’s lab at UCSF as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow. He has held faculty positions at UCSF, UCLA and UC San Diego.

Dr. David Perlmutter

doc_perlmutterBoard-Certified Neurologist Dr. David Perlmutter received his M.D. from the University of Miami School of Medicine. He is a recipient of the Linus Pauling Award for his innovative approaches to neurological disorders, Clinician of the Year Award from the National Nutritional Foods Association, and Humanitarian of the Year award from the American College of Nutrition.Dr. Perlmutter has been interviewed on 20/20, Larry King Live, CNN, Fox News, The Today Show, Oprah, and CBS.

Founder’s Story

Photoshop USHA IMG_3934My name is Usha Norman and my story is worth sharing. My career began in the world of Information Technology where I stayed for 20 years. Then on November 11, 2013, I had a close encounter with death and a terrifying insight into the world of Alzheimer’s disease.

On the morning of January 3, 2008 my husband suddenly died of cardiac arrest. The grief was long, hard and sporadic as I journeyed towards healing.

It was in those moments of anguish that I felt the need to channel my grief into something more worthwhile. I decided to become a hospice volunteer. I was hopeful that in attending to the suffering of others, I would find answers that would explain the sudden and untimely death of my husband. Hospice volunteering turned out to be a transforming and life-affirming experience. I began to understand that each life journey is unique and that sudden death was perhaps a blessing that prevented long term suffering and pain.

Most of my hospice experience was in caring for Alzheimer’s patients and their families. During those years of volunteering, I witnessed the heart wrenching experience of mothers, fathers, sisters and brothers whose lives were gradually being erased from memory by Alzheimer’s. Each day brought new sets of challenges to face and conquer. The toll on their families and caregivers was equally challenging.

Then on November 11, 2013, I experienced a short term memory loss of my own where I gained insight into the dreaded world of Alzheimer’s disease. My normal perception of reality shifted into an obscure place where everything within my consciousness slowed down and each task became a challenge.

The first sign that something was amiss came when my niece called that evening of November 11, 2013. That morning I had left her a message to call me back to coordinate an upcoming trip. From that point on, my self-awareness gradually began to falter. I remember walking into the kitchen and opening the refrigerator door in an attempt to make a sandwich but I did not know how. My ability to retrieve and process information and act upon it began to fail.

At around 6 p.m. my niece called back. Finding me incoherent and repetitive, she called my daughter who on arrival found me wandering aimlessly from one room of the house to the next.

Since my memory loss was significant, a family doctor was consulted and the decision was made to rush me into the emergency room of a nearby hospital. The route that I knew so well was now an intricate maze. Once in the hospital, the emergency room doctor was asking simple questions that made no sense.

The diagnosis reveled that my blood pressure had reached unsafe levels leading to the memory loss that I was experiencing. I was admitted to the hospital and over the next 24 hours, my blood pressure was stabilized and miraculously I recovered with no serious injuries.

It is from that moment on that I made a conscious decision to explore, research and follow the guidelines of cognitive health and spread the word that simple lifestyle choices can preserve and save our memories for a lifetime.

UCLA Memory Loss Reversed

 Buckinstitute

Contact:
Kris Rebillot
Director of Communications
Buck Institute for Research on Aging
(415) 209-2080
krebillot@buckinstitute.org


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s reversed for first time.

Small trial from UCLA and Buck Institute succeeds using systems approach to memory disorders

Patient one had two years of progressive memory loss. She was considering quitting her job, which involved analyzing data and writing reports, she got disoriented driving, and mixed up the names of her pets.

Patient two kept forgetting once familiar faces at work, forgot his gym locker combination, and had to have his assistants constantly remind him of his work schedule.

Patient three’s memory was so bad she used an iPad to record everything, then forgot her password. Her children noticed she commonly lost her train of thought in mid-sentence, and often asked them if they had carried out the tasks that she mistakenly thought she had asked them to do.

September 29,2014/Novato and Los Angeles, CA Since its first description over 100 years ago, Alzheimer’s disease has been without effective treatment. That may finally be about to change: in the first, small study of a novel, personalized and comprehensive program to reverse memory loss, nine of 10 participants, including the ones above, displayed subjective or objective improvement in their memories beginning within 3-to-6 months after the program’s start.

Of the six patients who had to discontinue working or were struggling with their jobs at the time they joined the study, all were able to return to work or continue working with improved performance. Improvements have been sustained, and as of this writing the longest patient follow-up is two and one-half years from initial treatment. These first ten included patients with memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), or subjective cognitive impairment (SCI; when a patient reports cognitive problems). One patient, diagnosed with late stage Alzheimer’s, did not improve.

The study, which comes jointly from the UCLA Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, is the first to suggest that memory loss in patients may be reversed, and improvement sustained, using a complex, 36-point therapeutic program that involves comprehensive changes in diet, brain stimulation, exercise, optimization of sleep, specific pharmaceuticals and vitamins, and multiple additional steps that affect brain chemistry.

The findings, published in the current online edition of the journal Aging, “are very encouraging. However, at the current time the results are anecdotal, and therefore a more extensive, controlled clinical trial is warranted,” said Dale Bredesen, the Augustus Rose Professor of Neurology and Director of the Easton Center at UCLA, a professor at the Buck Institute, and the author of the paper.

In the case of Alzheimer’s disease, Bredesen notes, there is not one drug that has been developed that stops or even slows the disease’s progression, and drugs have only had modest effects on symptoms.

Other chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and HIV, have been improved through the use of combination therapies, he noted. Yet in the case of Alzheimer’s and other memory disorders, comprehensive combination therapies have not been explored.

The uniform failure of drug trials in Alzheimer’s influenced Bredesen’s research to get a better understanding of the fundamental nature of the disease. His laboratory has found evidence that Alzheimer’s disease stems from an imbalance in nerve cell signaling: in the normal brain, specific signals foster nerve connections and memory making, while balancing signals support memory loss, allowing irrelevant information to be forgotten. But in Alzheimer’s disease, the balance of these opposing signals is disturbed, nerve connections are suppressed, and memories are lost.

The model of multiple targets and an imbalance in signaling runs contrary to the popular dogma that Alzheimer’s is a disease of toxicity, caused by the accumulation of sticky plaques in the brain. Bredesen believes the amyloid beta peptide, the source of the plaques, has a normal function in the brain – as part of a larger set of molecules that promotes signals that cause nerve connections to lapse. Thus the increase in the peptide that occurs in Alzheimer’s disease shifts the memory-making vs. memory-breaking balance in favor of memory loss.

Given all this, Bredesen thought that rather than a single targeted agent, the solution might be a systems type approach, the kind that is in line with the approach taken with other chronic illnesses—a multiple-component system.

“The existing Alzheimer’s drugs affect a single target, but Alzheimer’s disease is more complex. Imagine having a roof with 36 holes in it, and your drug patched one hole very well—the drug may have worked, a single “hole” may have been fixed, but you still have 35 other leaks, and so the underlying process may not be affected much.”

Bredesen’s approach is personalized to the patient, based on extensive testing to determine what is affecting the plasticity signaling network of the brain. As one example, in the case of the patient with the demanding job who was forgetting her way home, her therapeutic program consisted of some, but not all of the components involved with Bredesen’s therapeutic program, and included:

(1) eliminating all simple carbohydrates, leading to a weight loss of 20 pounds; (2) eliminating gluten and processed food from her diet, with increased vegetables, fruits, and non-farmed fish; (3) to reduce stress, she began yoga; (4) as a second measure to reduce the stress of her job, she began to meditate for 20 minutes twice per day; (5) she took melatonin each night; (6) she increased her sleep from 4-5 hours per night to 7-8 hours per night; (7) she took methylcobalamin each day; (8) she took vitamin D3 each day; (9) fish oil each day; (10) CoQ10 each day; (11) she optimized her oral hygiene using an electric flosser and electric toothbrush; (12) following discussion with her primary care provider, she reinstated hormone replacement therapy that had been discontinued; (13) she fasted for a minimum of 12 hours between dinner and breakfast, and for a minimum of three hours between dinner and bedtime; (14) she exercised for a minimum of 30 minutes, 4-6 days per week.

The results for nine of the 10 patients reported in the paper suggest that memory loss may be reversed, and improvement sustained with this therapeutic program, said Bredesen. “This is the first successful demonstration,” he noted, but he cautioned that the results are anecdotal, and therefore a more extensive, controlled clinical trial is needed.

The downside to this program is its complexity. It is not easy to follow, with the burden falling on the patients and caregivers, and none of the patients were able to stick to the entire protocol. The significant diet and lifestyle changes, and multiple pills required each day, were the two most common complaints. The good news, though, said Bredesen, are the side effects: “It is noteworthy that the major side effect of this therapeutic system is improved health and an optimal body mass index, a stark contrast to the side effects of many drugs.”

The results for nine of the 10 patients reported in the paper suggest that memory loss may be reversed, and improvement sustained with this therapeutic program, said Bredesen. “This is the first successful demonstration,” he noted, but he cautioned that the results need to be replicated. “The current, anecdotal results require a larger trial, not only to confirm or refute the results reported here, but also to address key questions raised, such as the degree of improvement that can be achieved routinely, how late in the course of cognitive decline reversal can be effected, whether such an approach may be effective in patients with familial Alzheimer’s disease, and last, how long improvement can be sustained,” he said.

Cognitive decline is a major concern of the aging population. Already, Alzheimer’s disease affects approximately 5.4 million Americans and 30 million people globally. Without effective prevention and treatment, the prospects for the future are bleak. By 2050, it’s estimated that 160 million people globally will have the disease, including 13 million Americans, leading to potential bankruptcy of the Medicare system. Unlike several other chronic illnesses, Alzheimer’s disease is on the rise–recent estimates suggest that AD has become the third leading cause of death in the United States behind cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Multiple entities provided support for the study including the National Institutes of Health (AG16570, AG034427 and AG036975). Please see paper for the complete list.

The Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research is part of the UCLA Department of Neurology which encompasses more than 26 disease-related research programs. This includes all of the major categories of neurological diseases and methods, encompassing neurogenetics and neuroimaging as well as health services research. The 140 faculty members of the Department are distinguished scientists and clinicians who have been ranked #1 in NIH funding for 9 consecutive years beginning in 2002. The Department is dedicated to understanding the human nervous system and improving the lives of people with neurological diseases, focusing on three key areas: patient/clinical care, research, and education. For more information, see http://www.neurology.ucla.edu/

The Buck Institute is the U.S.’s first independent research organization devoted to Geroscience – focused on the connection between normal aging and chronic disease. Based in Novato, CA, The Buck is dedicated to extending “Healthspan”, the healthy years of human life and does so utilizing a unique interdisciplinary approach involving laboratories studying the mechanisms of aging and those focused on specific diseases. Buck scientists strive to discover new ways of detecting, preventing and treating age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, cancer, cardiovascular disease, macular degeneration, osteoporosis, diabetes and stroke.  In their collaborative research, they are supported by the most recent developments in genomics, proteomics, bioinformatics and stem cell technologies. For more information: www.thebuck.org

UCLA Mentors

Dr. Dale Bredesen

dr_bredesenDr. Dale Bredesen was the Buck Institute’s founding President and CEO and is an internationally recognized expert on Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Bredesen’s ground-breaking discoveries have led to a recent clinical trial as well as evidence for memory loss reversal associated with Alzheimer’s disease using lifestyle modifications. He earned his M.D. from Duke University Medical Center and served as Chief Resident in Neurology at UCSF before joining Nobel laureate Stanley Prusiner’s lab at UCSF as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow. He has held faculty positions at UCSF, UCLA and UC San Diego.

Dr. Bredesen says Dr. Perlmutter’s new book, Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain—for Life, explains how nurturing gut health can enhance brain function. “Thanks in large part to a dramatic new understanding of the brain-gut-microbiome connection, there’s new hope for the treatment of autism to Alzheimer’s to multiple sclerosis. David Perlmutter is a leader in this burgeoning field. His book is a landmark contribution.””Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth about Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar—Your Brain’s Silent Killers explains how the American diet, rich in gluten and inflammatory foods, is linked to neurological conditions. Dr. Perlmutter outlines a brilliant blueprint for optimal health and resilient brain through proper nutrition and ifestyle.”

Dr. David Perlmutter

doc_perlmutterBoard-Certified Neurologist Dr. David Perlmutter received his M.D. from the University of Miami School of Medicine. He is a recipient of the Linus Pauling Award for his innovative approaches to neurological disorders, Clinician of the Year Award from the National Nutritional Foods Association, and Humanitarian of the Year award from the American College of Nutrition.Dr. Perlmutter has been interviewed on 20/20, Larry King Live, CNN, Fox News, The Today Show, Oprah, and CBS.

UCLA Brain Boosting Guidelines

Memory loss may be reversed, and improvement sustained with this therapeutic program”, said Dr. Dale E. Bredesen of UCLA.

These guidelines are collected from trials conducted at UCLA and The Buck Institute using systemic approach to memory disorders. These are trials of patients who were treated by Dr. Dale E. Bredesen of UCLA.

Ten memory-loss patients, some with brain-scans confirming patterns of Alzheimer’s, participated in a small UCLA trial called MEND (Metabolic Enhancement for NeuroDegeneration).ucla-case-study

In the UCLA protocol, patients made dramatic lifestyle changes. They avoided simple carbs and processed foods. They increased their fish intake, took yoga and meditated. They were instructed to take melatonin, get adequate sleep, incorporate vitamin B-12, vitamin D-3 and fish oil.

Within six months, nine patients saw a noticeable improvement in memory. One patient, who was in the late stages of Alzheimer’s, di
d not show improvement.

UCLA researchers say the findings suggest at least early on, changing a person’s metabolic processes can bring back memory and cognitive function.

Six of the patients in the study who had to discontinue working were all able to return to their jobs. Study authors say some patients were followed up to two and a half years and the memory improvements remained.

Plans are underway to do larger studies on this therapeutic program.

For more information on the study go to: Reversal of cognitive decline: A novel therapeutic program

A general approach to a brain boosting lifestyle is listed below:  For more serious neurological disorders please contact UCLA’s Buck Institute for a neurological evaluation.
  1. Eliminate simple carbohydrates and processed foods from the diet.
  2. Increase consumption of cruciferous vegetables – cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, broccoli. Include spinach okra and kale.
  3. Include blue berries, mangos, papaya, melons, pomegranates and bananas to your list of fruits.
  4. Include non-farmed cold water fish once or twice a week.
  5. Limit meat to occasional grass-fed beef or organic chicken.
  6. Add organically raised eggs as part of your breakfast
  7. Include yogurt and other probiotics to your diet
  8. Add coconut and olive oil to your diet.
  9. Drink 40 ounces of water each day and eliminate the intake of high fructose juices and sodas.
  10. Get 8 hours of sleep a day. (Add .5 mg of melatonin if needed).
  11. Include 30 minutes of strength training, aerobic or other workouts 5 times a week.
  12. Reduce stress by meditating or using relaxation techniques 20 minutes each day
  13. Optimized oral hygiene using an electric flosser and electric toothbrush
  14. Fast for a minimum of 12 hours between dinner and breakfast
  15. Add the following micronutrients to your daily diet
    • Turmeric 400 mg daily
    • Alpha Lipoic Acid 100 mg daily
    • Coenzyme Q10 100 mg twice daily
    • B-100 1 capsule daily
    • Vitamins C 400 mg daily
    • Vitamin D3 2000 IU daily
    • Fish oil with DHA or Krill oil 320mg and EPA 180mg per day
    • Ashwagandha 500mg daily

Low Glycemic Index Chart

low-glycemic-index1

What is Glycemic Index?

The glycemic index, or GI, measures how a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood glucose. Foods are ranked based on how they compare to a reference food — either glucose or white bread. A food with a high GI raises blood glucose more than a food with a medium or low GI.

Why is the Glycemic Index Important? Your body performs best when your blood sugar is kept relatively constant. If your blood sugar drops too low, you become lethargic and/or experience increased hunger. And if it goes too high, your brain signals your pancreas to secrete more insulin.

Some carbohydrate-containing foods cause the blood glucose level to rise rapidly; others have a more gradual effect. The glycemic index measures how fast and how much a food raises blood glucose levels. Foods with higher index values raise blood sugar more rapidly than foods with lower glycemic index values.

Glycemic Index Ratings Table

Food Group

Very Low GI

Low GI

Medium GI

High GI

         

 Vegetables

       

 

asparagus carrots beets potatoe
  avocados eggplant corn  
  beet greens garlic leeks  
  bell peppers green peas sweet potatoes  
  bok choy onions    
  broccoli sea vegetables    
  Brussels sprouts winter squash    
  cabbage      
  cauliflower      
  celery      
  collard greens      
  cucumbers      
  fennel (bulb)      
  green beans      
  kale      
  mushrooms, crimini      
  mustard greens      
  olives      
  olive oil      
  Romaine and other lettuce      
  spinach      
  summer squash      
  Swiss chard      
  tomatoes      
  turnip greens      
         

Fruits

   
    bananas cantaloupe  
    blueberries figs  
    cranberries papaya  
    grapefruit pineapple  
    grapes raisins  
    kiwifruit watermelon  
    lemons/limes    
    oranges    
    pears    
    plums    
    prunes    
    raspberries    
    strawberries    
     apples  apricots  

Nuts & Seeds

   
  sesame seeds cashews    
   flaxseed almonds    
    pumpkin seeds    
    sunflower seeds    
    walnuts    
     peanuts    

Beans & Legumes

   
  tofu dried peas    
  tempeh garbanzo beans    
    kidney beans    
    lentils    
    lima beans    
    navy beans    
    pinto beans    
   soybeans  black beans    

Seafood

   
  salmon      
  sardines      
  shrimp      
  tuna      
   cod  scallops    

Meats

     
  chicken-pasture-raised      
  lamb, grass-fed      
  turkey, pasture-raised      
   beef, grass-fed      

Dairy

     
    eggs, pasture-raised    
    cow’s milk, grass-fed    
    yogurt, grass-fed    
    cheese grass-fed    

Grains

   
    brown rice    
    buckwheat    
    oats    
    quinoa    
    rye    
    whole wheat    
     barley  millet  

Spices and Herbs

     
turmeric      
  cilantro & coriander seeds      
  cinnamon      
  cloves      
  cumin seeds      
  dill
ginger      
  mustard seeds      
  oregano      
  parsley      
  peppermint      
  rosemary      
  sage      
  thyme      
  black pepper

 

Super Foods Chart

brainboostingfoods1

What are super foods?

Super foods are certain foods that are included on the list of ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbency Capacity) Food Chart.

List Of Superfoods. One of the things that make a food a superfood is the amount of antioxidants it contains (measured in Oxygen Radical Absorbency Capacity – ORAC). High ORAC value is one of the several requirements for a food to qualify as a superfood. Below you will find the charts for the amount of ORAC in certain foods, some of which are foods that boost immune system and are on our list of superfoods.

ORAC Fruit Chart

oracchart1

* while pecan nuts, walnuts and ginger root are not fruits, we have added them to the fruit chart because of their high ORAC values, and as a comparison with fruit.

ORAC Spice Chart

oracchart2

ORAC Vegetable Chart

oracchart3

If we want to understand the importance of consuming a variety of foods that boost immune system we must first understand some of the basic nutrient interactions. The following list is a short list of how some nutrients interact and should give you an idea of some of the complex processes that occur in the body:

  • Glutathione recycles vitamins C and E and puts them back to work as antioxidants.
  • Cells do not produce Glutathione without the precursor amino acid components: glutamate, glycine and cysteine.
  • Low intracellular Glutathione levels cause the cell’s death.The conversion of beta-carotene to vitamin A depends on the availability of vitamin C, zinc and thyroid hormones while vitamin C, E and selenium enhance the function of beta-carotene.
  • Magnesium is necessary for conversion of vitamin B1 (thiamine) into its active form, and vitamin C helps improve thiamine absorption.
  • Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) is necessary for the activation of vitamin B6.
  • Vitamins B6, B2 and iron are necessary for the conversion of tryptophan (an essential amino acid) to vitamin B3 (niacin).
  • Tryptophan is a biochemical precursor for serotonin which in turn can be converted to melatonin.
  • Folic acid requires vitamin B12, niacin and vitamin C to be converted to its active form.
  • Vitamin C helps reduce folic acid excretion.
  • Vitamin C increases the absorption of iron and improves the stability of vitamin E.
  • Vitamin B6 deficiency reduces vitamin B12 absorption.
  • Vitamin D is necessary for the absorption and metabolism of calcium and phosphorus.
  • Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) is necessary for the synthesis of vitamin D.
  • Vitamin E is necessary for the action of vitamin A and regulates the levels of that vitamin.
  • Potassium decreases urinary loss of calcium, etc.The intricacies and interdependency of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phytochemicals, micronutrients and macronutrients is much farther reaching than this short list, but hopefully this list is exhaustive enough to drive home how important it is to maintain a diverse diet.Most foods that boost immune system are those that are good sources of one or two particular vitamins, minerals or nutrients, so eat a diversity of foods. For the immune system to function properly and be able to defend your body against pathogens, it is very important to supply the body with a sufficient amount of all vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and amino acids. Immune health and proper immune response cannot be obtained without all these essentials.